5 Ways to Know if your Stress is actually Anxiety

5 Ways to Know if your Stress is actually Anxiety

Everyone experiences stress and worry from time to time. The difference between feeling stressed versus having clinical anxiety is very specific. Here are a few things to keep an eye out for if you’re wondering if your worry is becoming a problem.

Feeling anxious can stem from stressful situations so mix kids, marriage, traffic, COVID-19, and BAM! You’ve got stress. Anxiety, however, is different. It’s a mindset that isn’t a feeling. It comes when we don’t want it and keeps us from being able to stay present in the moment. Here are a few ways to know if you worried feelings may be turning into anxiety.

  • You’ve tried tons of different things to control the worry but nothing seems to help. You’ve read different articles and blogs and tried all of the different tips you’ve heard from others. Still nothing seems to be working? Anxiety is a constant and pervasive experience. It happens with the largest and smallest of things. It often plagues your day-to-day mind, making it hard to concentrate on anything other than what you’re worried about. If you’ve tried different things and nothing seems to be working, this may be a sign to get extra help.
  • Your day-to-day routine is suffering. You find yourself avoiding certain places in an effort to avoid the anxiety. Others have noticed you’re starting to become MIA more often and are worried about you. Things you used to be able to enjoy aren’t fun anymore and you don’t feel like yourself.
  • Your eating and sleeping patterns are unstable. Eating and sleeping are part of our basic needs- we need these to survive. With preoccupations of the mind, your body may respond too. There are times anxiety will make you miss meals without realizing it, or seek different comfort foods to try and cope. You may find yourself getting restless at night despite being really tired. The mind has a hard time just “shutting off” which makes for late nights trying to get to sleep. Just remember, unintentional disruptions of eating or sleeping patterns are never good.
  • Other people notice. Despite your best attempts to keep things under control and away from the social eye, those around you are noticing. They see you getting anxious more often and might say you seem “different “or “off.” Remember a lot of times those around us who love us and spend a lot of time with us can notice these things before we do. If someone is noticing it, it may be worth seeking extra help.
  • Anxiety attacks. A lot of times with anxiety, comes panic which can create panic or anxiety attacks. Shortness of breath, feeling as though you will pass out, rapid heart rate, sweatiness, feeling out of control, feeling chills or really hot? This may be your body’s response to feeling emotionally and mentally dysregulated. You don’t feel calm and steady emotionally so your body is “off” too.

If you have experienced, or are experiencing, any of the above, don’t hesitate to reach out for extra support. You don’t need to have all of the criteria in order to be in counseling or get help from a doctor. Although you may not have clinical anxiety, if this article sounds like you, it’s clear you’re feeling stressed or anxious about something. Don’t wait until problems get worse. Keep your health as number one, and when in doubt ask. Here are a few tips to managing anxiety.

Send us a message if you’re not sure what else to do. We guarantee a response within 12 hours, including evenings, holidays, and weekends.

4 Questions to Answer BEFORE Starting Counseling

So you’ve decided it’s time to get counseling, but you’re not sure where to start?

Here are the 4 questions you must answer before choosing a counselor:

  1. Will I use my insurance or go the private pay route?
  2. What is the problem I’m facing?
  3. What are their office hours?
  4. How quickly do I want to start?

INSURANCE OR PRIVATE PAY?

 If you want to use your insurance, call the member services line on the back of your insurance card and ask them to send you a list of “MENTAL HEALTH/BEHAVIORAL HEALTH providers” in your network. From this list, do your research online and see if you can find a good match.

Contrary to what some may think, not every counselor takes your insurance

Be sure to call your insurance to see if they will cover counseling sessions [like phone or virtual counseling, couples counseling or group counseling]. 

If you are using the private pay, take a look at your finances. Many private pay counseling sessions can run you anywhere between $90-$160 per one-hour session. There are, however, other options such as sliding scale fees, hardship options, or lowered rates with clinicians. 

PRESENTING PROBLEM

If you had to sum up the problem you’re facing in 1 to 3 words, what would it be? Anxiety? Family problems? Marital issues? Child’s behavior? Whatever it is, try to narrow it down. Don’t diagnose yourself, but gain an idea so you can explain it to the person on the other end of the line. It’s important your counselor has experience with your issue. Counselors have specialties or niches; so again, contrary to what you may think, not every counselor has experience or works with your presenting problem. 

Also VERY important, if the person needing counseling is a child (under 18), specifically ask if the counselor has experience working with their age group (preschoolers/elementary aged/tweens/teens).

OFFICE HOURS

Counseling can be hard enough, don’t make things more complicated by having someone whose office location or hours are inconvenient for your life situation. If you live in a large city, there are actually more counselors than you may think. Check into different office locations, hours and days open during the week and make sure it compliments your life schedule. If needed, ask about virtual counseling as this could also help take the hassle out of a weekly drive to an appointment.

WAIT TIME?

Lastly, and perhaps most important, how quick is their turnaround time? How long will it take to set up an initial appointment? Some counselors have availability to see a new client asap, others have a wait list and some aren’t taking new clients at all. This is a tough trade off because some counselors are worth the wait. However, if you’re issue is urgent and pressing, the sooner the better.

I hope this list helps! Happy hunting!

 

Barely Adjusting or Well Adjusted?

Barely Adjusting or Well Adjusted?

Does staying at home make you feel like your mind is going a little crazy? Have you noticed how many people seem to be adjusting, baking, crafting, completed DIY projects and being stellar home school teachers? Do you feel the exact opposite?

You’re not alone. Over the course of the past 6 weeks, people and communities nationwide have felt the implications of “adjusting” at home. I have heard story after story of their so-called adjustment, or lack thereof. While some are sharing how their increased time at home has been a “blessing to spend more time with family” others have secretly cried and wondered if something must be “wrong” if all they wish for is to “escape” their family for only 20 minutes.

Don’t be alarmed. Many are wondering when the whole “adjusting” will kick in instead of barely making it through each day. The reality is we don’t know the answer to that. What we do know, is adjustment takes time, consistency and applying some source of routine for emotions and thoughts to begin to chill out.

Think about an elementary aged kiddo who goes to school. There is a start and end time to school, he/she hypothetically has the same teacher, is in the same class, with the same general schedule, with the same kids, and eating lunch at the same time. Why? Because people, not just children, do well with routine, structure and predictability.

So let’s think about that, why have the effects of COVID 19 been so hard to adjust to? No predictability, not enough time since initial impact, and lack of structure or routine.

How to begin adjusting:

  • Create structure as best you can. Wake up at the same time each day, eat meals around the same time, brush your teeth, change your clothes, and develop a bedtime routine for all in the family.
  • Give it time. Yes, time. Natural adjustments take months, and contrary to popular belief, you aren’t creating a habit at 28 days or even 40.
  • Focus only on things you can control. There are three things and three things only you have ANY control over – your thoughts, your feelings and your actions.
  • Social connection- find others you can facetime with, look into support groups to join virtually, call people you haven’t in awhile, wave to your neighbors.
  • Go outside. Change your scenery and get back in touch with nature. Stretch your legs and go for a walk, drink your coffee on your balcony. Even a few minutes goes a long way.
  • Social media detox. Look at the total amount of time spent on social media per week. Imagine that amount of hours invested into something else… (mind blowing)
  • Silence your mind. Don’t fill your mind with too many thoughts at one time. Try and focus only on the things that are unfolding to you in this moment. Engage all of your senses and demand of your mind to stay here. No thinking of the past or future, just the now.

Whether you’re rocking a sparkling clean home, a pinterest-looking office and thinking about a future as a school teacher, or wearing yoga pants, sneaking out during the day to “water the grass” to have a moment of silence, or counting down the moments until things go back to “normal”- you’re not the only one. This goes out to the well-adjusted and barely adjusting, you’re not alone. Hang in there champ.

What is this Telehealth Business?

What is this Telehealth Business?

Telehealth has been called “distance counseling,” “telecounseling,” “virtual counseling,” “online therapy” and the like. We’re all talking about the same thing- counseling that happens virtually through a tech device. The American Counseling Association defines it as the following:

“Telebehavioral health, or distance counseling, is the use of a digital platform that provides secure, encrypted, audio-video conferencing to communicate with a client in real time.”

Since the arrival of the global pandemic we call COVID-19, you have probably seen more and more people transfer services to digital or virtual mediums. Counseling is no different. But lucky for us, telehealth counseling services have been around for decades (check out more about that on the International Conference on Computer Communications).

The benefits of Telehealth Counseling?

  • Convenience– You can have counseling from your house, office or even car (not moving of course!)- all in the comfort of gym shorts.
  • Saving time– You don’t have to drive to your counselor’s office, get stuck in traffic, or have to wait three lights to get through that busy intersection. Some even have their session during their lunch hour… not that I recommend that.
  • You’ve already got what you need– No need to purchase any new or fancy equipment. Chances are you already have a cellphone, computer or ipad- any of these will do.
  • Validity– Telehealth counseling with a professional is legit. Not only has it been around awhile but there are ethics and rights that protect you. Only secure platforms are used and privacy is still a priority.
  • Continuity of care– There is less chance of breaking the momentum of counseling. Car problems? Sick kiddo at home? Out of town conference? Counseling can still take place.

The flip side?

  • Bad connection– Although you’re connected virtually, you’re obviously disconnected physically. It can be hard to read nonverbal communication and sometimes slow internet speed can make things choppy. Boo.
  • Too “new school”– Technology can bring people together to communicate. While it has its perks, some feel it “gets in the way” of human connection. We get it- it can be kinda weird staring at a computer screen.
  • Issues with technology– “Can you hear me now?” “Can you see me?” “Can you repeat that?” “Your face is frozen.” “Let’s hang up and try again.” Potential phrases you or your counselor could say.

So, what are my thoughts on the matter?

Telehealth isn’t my first option, but I’m glad it’s an option at all. Through the use of technology, I have been able to remain connected with clients despite global pandemics, unexpected family situations, and times their kid throws up in the car on the way to school. It has helped to bring people together and has helped to provide hope and emotional support through technology, even when things seem bleak. Thank you Mr. Technology, I’m glad you’re here.

How to Deal with Sadness During the Winter Season #whysoglumchum

How to Deal with Sadness During the Winter Season #whysoglumchum

Not feeling the holiday spirit? Do the holidays have you feeling glum? If so, you’re not the only one. Did you know holidays have a tendency of making those who feel happy, happier? and those who feel sad, sadder?

Maybe you’re grieving a breakup, divorce, death of a loved one or even the diagnosis of a medical condition. Perhaps you fall into the category where the winter season causes you to feel more depressed or anxious. Whatever the case, I need you to know you’re not the only one.

If you fall into any of these categories, here are 6 things you can try to boost your spirit:

Volunteer– humans are social creatures so doing something with, around or for others in an act of service or fellowship can enhance connection. Community and service can give one a feeling of satisfaction, accomplishment and fulfillment.

Attitude of gratitude– Finding things to be thankful for can increase overall feelings of happiness while decreasing feelings of depression. You can shift your mental lens of seeing life as a joyful experience rather than disappointment. Think of three things you’re grateful for before you even get out of bed. Then dwell on these things throughout the day. Train your brain to be more appreciative.

Be in nature– over the holidays if you’re feeling disconnected from others, it’s important to feel connected to something. Take a walk in the park, watch the sun set or see what new birds may be in your area.

Include natural light– During the winter, daylight is shorter; with less sun, we use more artificial light which can throw our internal rhythms off.  So do your best to have natural light around you during the day. Light exposure can help regulate hormones and chemicals in your brain that affect your overall sleep and mood. So, if you work in a cubicle or windowless area, go outside during your break. When at home, open up curtains and blinds (not the actual windows) to let natural light inside.

Step out of routine– Do something you enjoy that you don’t normally do. Bring an air of excitement or unpredictability. Instead of watching a movie, read a book. Reach out to someone you haven’t spoken to in awhile. Clean out that junk drawer. Cook a new meal.

Have a Staycation– If you’re unable to meet or travel to see your loved ones, enjoy the city you’re in. When was the last time you went to the library or to the nearest farmers market? See what tourists enjoy doing in your area and do it!

If you’re feeling low during the holidays or wintertime, just know you’re not alone. Countless people feel discouraged or down during times they “should” feel otherwise. If there has been a common theme of anxiety or depression for some time, there are people who can help. Look up local counselors, therapists or emotional support groups- if you’re not sure where to start, send me an email and I would be happy to help you or point you in the right direction.

Marriage Advice #ido

Marriage Advice #ido

I recently took an informal poll (shout out, you know who you are!) to hear what tips for a budding marriage all those married, separated, or divorced out there had. While the population was diverse, there were clear themes of listening and communication, being best friends, having TONS of patience and something about not going to bed angry. The biggest discrepancy, however, was in managing finances- to have or not to have joint bank accounts, that is the question (in Shakespearean tone of voice). No wonder it ranks as one of the top topics for greatest fights within a relationship! Take a read for some of the advice given from dozens of people who have been married from weeks to decades!:

  • Always talk about your day, offer to help , never forget to tell him/her how much (s)he makes you feel better and special.
  • Never go to bed angry….and always remember to continue to date your spouse…
  • Forgive quickly.
  • It’s not always easy. Sometimes you have to CHOOSE to love. Marriage is a choice everyday to commit to that person. The minute you stop doing that you are headed for a rocky path.
  • Hangout for hours- talk, listen to music and just be together.
  • Dedicate yourself to being useful to the person you love.
  • Not every fight needs to be resolved. If it’s something petty there’s no need to hash it out, just agree to disagree. Make out like teenagers regularly. Keeps you young. (Christina Gonzales Polanco, San Antonio, TX).
  • Add humor to serious conversations when you’re at a crossroads
  • 123. 1. Own up, apologize even if it was unintended 2. Validate each others feelings 3. Try to learn from mistakes and vow to try not to make the mistake again.
  • Don’t sweat the small stuff. It’s all small stuff.
  • Avoid being touchy or emotional.
  • Respect and love each other as equals. You’re partners.
  • Have a budget!
  • Listen and communicate.
  • Kiss hello and goodbye.
  • Don’t lie.
  • Pick your battles. It won’t always be “fair”, so agree to disagree and remain friends.
  • God, love, respect, trust.
  • Never deny making love unless both are not in agreement.
  • There is a solution to every problem. Be committed to finding that solution together as ONE.
  • Put God first above all else and he will bless your marriage!
  • Practice tolerance every day.
  • We can get caught up in kids, jobs, etc., but when all that goes away – you will only have one another.
  • When the little things start getting on your nerves, remember it was those same little things that made you fall in love.
  • Forgiveness is important, play, laugh be silly and always touch.
  • Pray together.
  • Never stop dating.
  • God first, then spouse, then kids.

Anything else you might add? Comment below!